Home Wisdom Articles Yoga Venerating Tirthankars through Yoga – Part 3

Venerating Tirthankars through Yoga – Part 3

Yoga asanas can become a medium of expressing our reverence towards the Tirthankar Bhagwans. Inspired by the work on Jain Yoga by Shri Shantilal D. Parakh, these asanas are derived from various aspects of the 24 Tirthankars like Their life stories, symbols (lanchans) and virtues. Let us add an element of devotion in our yoga practice through these asanas

What

Swastikasana Honouring Shri Suparshwanath Bhagwan

Why this Name

This asana derives its name from the Sanskrit words ‘swastik’, which denotes ‘auspicious symbol’ and ‘asana’ which means ‘pose.’ Swastik is the lanchan of the seventh Tirthankar, Shri Suparshwanath Bhagwan.

How to do it

  • Start by sitting cross-legged on your mat.
  • Inhale and place the sole of the right foot over and in between the thigh and calf of the left leg.
  • Exhale, grab the toes of the left foot with the hand and pull the left foot under and in between the right thigh and right lower leg.
  • Ensure to always keep the right leg on top and keep the back, neck and spine erect.
  • Ensure the toes of both feet are completely hidden so that energy does not seep through the toes.
  • Place both palms in Jnanamudra and rest the wrists on the knees, with the palms facing upwards.
  • Hold this position for 10 counts, breathe deeply and chant the mantra ‘Ṇamo Supāsāṇaṁ’ mentally or loudly.
  • Release the pose, come back to the original position and relax.

Which Benefits

  • Reduces fat from the legs and makes the calf muscles stronger.
  • Elongates and strengthens the spine.
  • Stretches the lower body.
  • Alleviates hip, back and neck pain.
  • Helps reduce lethargy.
  • Stimulates the brain.
  • Helpful for meditation.

Contraindications

  • Avoid performing this asana if you have sciatica or hip, knee, ankle injury.

What

Tiryaka Tadasana variation honouring Shri Chandraprabha Bhagwan

Why this Name

This asana derives its name from the Sanskrit words ‘tiryaka,’ which means ‘oblique,’ ‘tada’ – ‘palm tree’ and ‘asana’ – ‘pose’. This asana forms a shape resembling the crescent moon which is the lanchan of the eighth Tirthankar, Shri Chandraprabha Bhagwan.

How to do it

  • Start in Tadasana with the feet together.
  • Inhale and raise the arms up above the head and keep the elbows straight in Namaskara Mudra. The arms should be slightly touching the ears.
  • Exhale, bend the torso to the right side of the body giving a nice stretch on the left side of the upper body.
  • Ensure the body is in one plane and the upper body is not leaning forward or backwards.
  • Hold this asana for 10 counts.
  • Chant the mantra ‘Ṇamo Candapahūṇaṁ’ mentally or loudly while performing this asana.
  • Release into the original pose and relax.
  • Repeat the pose on the other side.

Which Benefits

  • Stretches the spinal column and muscles of the back.
  • Reduces belly fat and fat around the waist.
  • Improves blood circulation in the kidneys, liver and spleen.
  • Stimulates digestion.
  • For adolescents and young adults, this asana helps develop a strong core.

Contraindications

  • Avoid performing this asana if you are suffering from cardiac problems, hernia or vertigo or if you have acute back pain, slipped disc or severe shoulder injury.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Quotes

View All
#SadguruWhispers Upon hearing the flute of the Guru's teachings, the disciple is drawn towards its divine melody.